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The Margin: This TikTok user’s ‘Forbes Friends List’ ranks his travel buddies by income — ‘Broke Bobby’ makes $125K

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Hey, taking a trip with friends can carry a lot of drama-causing baggage, with different people often having different opinions about where they want to go, what they want to do, and how much they are willing to spend. 

So TikTok user Tom Cruz — no, really — who describes himself as an investor who owns more than 380 properties, has devised a spreadsheet to streamline his potential travel buddies … which sounds pretty savvy, at first. After all, it includes some key logistics like how much paid time off everyone has, and the maximum amount they can spend on a three- or seven-day trip.

But many viewers are having trouble getting past the fact that this spreadsheet — which, by the way, Cruz calls the “Forbes Friends List” and parodies the business site’s billionaires lists — ranks his friends by their projected 2021 income and expected bonuses, as well as whether they are willing to split the cost of a private jet, and whether they are “degenerate gamblers” or not. 

What’s more, he refers to the lowest-earning friend as “Broke Bobby” — as “Broke Bobby” only earns $125,000. The wealthiest person on the list, “Shawn,” makes a cool $5 million. “We all still hang out regardless of income” reads a caption, complete with smiley-face emoji. 

The original TikTok video appears to have been deleted, but a tweet reposting it with the caption “What in the wealth is this” has gone viral since Wednesday. It’s been viewed more than 2.4 million times on Twitter, drawn 47,000 “likes” and spurred almost 20,000 retweets and quote tweets. It also led “Broke Bobby” to trend with almost 11,000 tweets on Thursday.

“Imagine setting up a class system inside your friend group,” tweeted one. Another chimed in that if $125,000 a year made for a “Broke Bobby,” then he should be called “Poverty Pete.” 

Among the most popular responses:

Some other wild details on the spreadsheet include a friend whose relationship status is “complicated” and listed as “70%” single. 

Cruz called the spreadsheet “incredibly helpful” and “pragmatic” in his minute-long clip. 

“It allows us to avoid awkward situations within our friend group,” he explained. “Inviting certain friends that may or may not do what we wanna do, especially when it comes to gambling or spending a lot of money. So it works for us.” 

Cruz also posted a follow-up video answering some of the questions he is getting. For example, “Shawn” owns an unidentified software services company, and “Broke Bobby” is an accountant. The others on the list include doctors, investors and business owners.

He also posted his lowest-earning friends, who allegedly refer to themselves as the “Welfare Ten.” The lowest income on that list is $25,000 a year, while the highest earner on the “welfare” list makes $92,500. 

“There’s no income segregation. We all intermingle,” Cruz said. 

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